Written in the Stars

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Apparently, a little bit of knowledge can be dangerous. In that case I’m probably a ticking time bomb, considering all the bits I’ve picked up along the way. One thing about writing a sci-fi/fantasy series is that I get to play with all my bits without hurting anyone. Bits of information – I’m sure that no impure thoughts entered your mind at all there. I’ve stopped even planning the final book in the series now because the minute I think that the story will wither and be boring after too many, something new and awesome pops up.

I’ve got hundreds of interesting but strange findings, happenings, theories, legends, and all sorts of things tucked away in folders for possible future use in my scribbles. I’ve found that the stories that most tantalised and absorbed me have always been those that made me think and wonder how much of it could be, or have been, true. Apart from mockumentaries that is – they just really piss me off. The Blair Witch project, that exorcism gone wrong in Rome thing, and that stupid waste of money Mermaid thing. I’m not fond of being conned. But in fiction, when I come across something that sparks a memory of something I’ve seen or heard, especially if it’s cleverly disguised, I’m always drawn right in.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not using this as some sort of ploy to trap conspiracy theorists into blindly loving me up regardless of whether my writing is rotten or not. It’s something I enjoy doing, because the writing of it sends me off into these strange worlds of possibility, and that really rocks my boat. The multiple universe thing for me is a given. And of course there logically can’t be an end to them, because I can’t see how finite is a possible option when there is no such thing as empty space as far as we’ve seen. That’s just my opinion, and I’m pretty sure that we need to live and learn, at least for another couple of millennia, before we get close to really getting the real picture.

A friend once said of sci-fi/fantasy, “Why waste any time of your life writing about the impossible? Fairy tales are for kids, and I’m not prepared to read way out shite. Give me facts and things that are really possible, and I’ll enjoy the story!” (This was before I started writing by the way, so it wasn’t a personal attack) But still. Ever since I was a child, I’ve insisted that scientists have got dinosaurs all wrong. To begin with I was pretty sure that they put them together with the arms on backwards. I’ll give them that one now. But I always insisted that they must have had feathers. And I’ve always been told that that was just silly – dinosaurs never had feathers – end of. And now we’re starting to find that dinosaurs actually did have feathers, and I’m sure we’re going to find a lot more as our equipment gets better. So… (insert raspberry here) scientists! Erring on the side of caution is all very well, for scientists. But us sci-fi guys can happily zoom off into the other direction.

To me, it’s entirely possible that our legends of dragons stem from our collective ancient memories of very real, but gorgeous, flying beasts that munched us up now and then. Why not? There’s another cool theory that whatever you see in your mind, suddenly pops into existence somewhere. Another that something can’t exist unless it is seen. All most cool as far as sci-fi goes. Sci-fi guys have more problems with the other thing than the blocking I reckon – at least I do. Muse in need of mental Imodium. Never mind. So much previously science fact has had to be changed as we’ve progressed. Including with the carbon dating of ancient sites. There are more methods of dating artefacts now, and it’s not possible to properly date crystal. The given age of rocks – the rock we’re on – and the seas that she sails in is constantly under scrutiny, and changes now and then. Funnily enough, the changes always make us older. There are so many mysterious sites around the globe, like Puma Punku, that you can head off to, and eyeball with your own fair eyeball. Stonemasonry so precise and smooth, that it appears that the rock has been cut using extreme, EXTREME heat and welded together in ways that we can’t replicate today with all our knowledge and equipment, and that these structures were built before man (apparently) had figured out that living in caves was not the only way to go. Serious fodder for the imagination.

Puma Punku Wiki Commons
Puma Punku Wiki Commons

When you have as much procrastination research under your belt as I have, you begin to see a pattern. Strange and surprising coincidences and connections that make it easy for me to see nothing wild and whacky in my scribbling – only endless maybes. It is a true thing that we are all constantly being remade. We lose particles and we gain new particles. Particles that have been around for all eternity, joining our very physical make up, to become part of who we are. And they zoom in from all over the place. You could very well have a tiny atom lurking as a bit of the flesh of your left nostril that was once a part of the eyelash of a centaur living on a busy planet somewhere in Alph Centauri. That is science fact. So who is to say that some sort of residual memory from that particle doesn’t people the dreams and thoughts of scribblers like me – totally normal people, every one of us! And that our tales are more universal channelling than making stuff up. Anyway…..

Here’s an interesting thing. If you type this into the Google Earth search box 66 33′ 11.58″S 99 50′ 17.86″E, you’ll find this,

Opening 2

And then if you fiddle around and go down a bit, you’ll find this,

Opening

Secret entrances carved out of the ice in the Antarctic, you say? What’s that funny black roof, you ask? Well now…. I don’t know yet, but at some time, in some space or universe, they will appear in a scribble of mine, changed, twisted, vaguely memorable. These are the best kind of writing prompts for me. Rock on sci-fi guys!

1aa
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49 thoughts on “Written in the Stars

    Mira Prabhu said:
    March 14, 2014 at 2:19 pm

    I’m with you Jo Robinson! In fact I keep having variations of this conversation with my “scientifically-oriented” friends — I say all that man knows can fit onto the head of a pin compared to what there is to know in the cosmos — we use a thimble to measure the ocean when we assume, so arrogantly, that the ordinary human mind — not that of the enlightened being — groks everything.

    Like

      jorobinson176 responded:
      March 14, 2014 at 3:06 pm

      Groks – love it! Theoretically you can prove or disprove anything depending on the scientific work of your choice, but if those scientists looked at a little of everything – instead of focusing on one small spot, and with blinkers on, I think they’d be better off. Got to throw a lot in a pot to come up with a decent fact. 🙂 Good to meet you fellow traveler! 😀

      Like

    belsbror said:
    March 14, 2014 at 2:20 pm

    Mystery will not be added in the dictionary if it’s just for display. 🙂
    There will be events we can never explain today. But once we achieve real awakening, everything will be clearer.

    Like

      jorobinson176 responded:
      March 14, 2014 at 3:02 pm

      You are a wise one my friend, and I totally agree. I think we have a way to go yet. 😀 Heads in sand. 😉

      Like

        belsbror said:
        March 14, 2014 at 3:18 pm

        Hahaha! Not like an ostrich, please. 🙂
        You asked all the right questions. We should all help each other and look for answers.

        Like

    Charles Yallowitz said:
    March 14, 2014 at 2:29 pm

    Always funny when people say they dislike sci-fi/fantasy because it isn’t realistic. Kind of the point of the genre. Those Google Earth places are bizarre. Mole people?

    Like

      jorobinson176 responded:
      March 14, 2014 at 3:01 pm

      I reckon they say it’s not realistic because they won’t take the time to study the facts (I REALLY hope I don’t get beaten up for saying that!) the thing that I find most weird is that there is no snow layer on either of those entrances. That ice in the middle of the Antarctic, and that very plastic looking black roof thing don’t even have light dustings of snow. They’re so polished they look used, and there’s no record of them – officially. I want super powers! It would be so cool to just zoom on over and have a look. 🙂

      Like

        Charles Yallowitz said:
        March 14, 2014 at 3:09 pm

        I’m not sure if it’s studying the facts or letting the facts of a different world temporarily replace the ones of reality. For example, a world where magic exists is ‘believable’ within the confines of that world. In our world, much of what is done can’t happen.

        Could they be emergency bunkers left by science teams in case they’re caught out there in a storm?

        Like

    Mark Myers said:
    March 14, 2014 at 4:48 pm

    Procrastination = research. Hmmmm. I have to ponder that… Tomorrow

    Like

      jorobinson176 responded:
      March 20, 2014 at 8:23 am

      Ha ha ha haaaaa! It’s an extra scribblers bonus. 😉

      Like

    M T McGuire said:
    March 15, 2014 at 7:57 am

    I loved reading this. It’s exactly what I love to do. Stuff like Vilekofski (sorry can’t remember the correct spelling) who researched the bible and discovered certain stories are common to all religions; later research turning up that certain words for stuff like fire, water and things are similar. He reckoned, in the 1960s that there were just a handful of humans originally, everyone said it was bollocks. Then, in the noughties genetecists discover that everyone in Europe is descended from 7 people. Suddenly it’s not bollocks any more, it’s truth.

    I really enjoy taking a scientific truth or idea, adding a lot of imagination, and coming up with a load of plausible sounding bollocks. Which is lucky because it’s my job but it’s such fun. The puku puku one reminds me of some research I’m currently doing into my 5th book, Space Dustmen. So looking forward to writing that one.

    Cheers

    MTM

    Like

      jorobinson176 responded:
      March 20, 2014 at 8:22 am

      It’s spot on what you say about the similarities. Space Dustmen? Cool!!! Looking forward to that one too now. The research is actually blowing me away – the more I do, the more dots connect, and the more I wonder about life thousands of years ago. Life has been on Earth for millions of years, so it’s just logical to me that there probably have been civilisations a lot further advanced than we are. Like the stuff found in coal that formed before humans even (apparently) had fire – jewellery & hammers & stuff.

      Like

        M T McGuire said:
        March 20, 2014 at 9:39 am

        That’s actually exactly the kind of thing I am researching for Space Dustmen – the coal thing. I love all this stuff.

        Cheers

        MTM

        Like

          jorobinson176 responded:
          March 20, 2014 at 10:27 am

          If you weren’t still a spring chicken I’d say we were separated at birth! 🙂

          Like

            M T McGuire said:
            March 20, 2014 at 11:42 am

            45? Spring chicken? I am old, old, old… McMini told me I was making wise eyes at him this morning. There’s obviously some kind of expression I do. Phnark.

            Like

              jorobinson176 responded:
              March 20, 2014 at 1:14 pm

              Ha HaaaaaH! You’ve got five years to go then before you start the wild partying and youthful reverse ageing – heh. 😀 Your McMini is a wise little guy, and cool too. He must have figured you were on to him about something that you really weren’t – phnark to you. 😉 You’ll never be old with the smile on your dial and in your heart I reckon.

              Like

                M T McGuire said:
                March 20, 2014 at 1:40 pm

                As my Mum, who, a few months after 911 (aged about 68) decided to go on holiday with my Dad to Iran always says “Age is a state of mind.” Her and Dad are still some of the most easy to talk to people I know. They judge no-one.

                Like

    Forget the Viagra...Pass me a Carrot! said:
    March 15, 2014 at 9:04 am

    Reblogged this on Forget the Viagra, Pass Me a Carrot and commented:
    Great blog on Sci Fi writing from Jo Robinson. Personally I subscribe to the theory of cellular memory – our instincts have been honed over hundreds of thousands of years – but like animals who instinctively behave in a certain way without outside interference – I think there is far more we don’t know than understand. This may explain why I have a dinosaur bone through my left ear lobe!!!

    Like

      jorobinson176 responded:
      March 20, 2014 at 8:17 am

      LOLOLOL! I thought my dinosaur bone was part of my Irish heritage. 😀 Thank you so much for sharing Sally – you are the loveliest, kindest lady, my friend! XXXXXXXXXX

      Like

        Forget the Viagra...Pass me a Carrot! said:
        March 20, 2014 at 8:28 am

        Well perhaps the craziest – just off to do battle with blue rinse ladies who park their trollies sideways in the aisles, aimlessly followed by husbands who would rather be in a sports bar! I would almost prefer a spear and a trek on the veld – almost! XXXS

        Like

    Kev said:
    March 15, 2014 at 8:06 pm

    I look forward to finding some of this wonderful research you’ve done in your future works Jo. 😉

    Like

      jorobinson176 responded:
      March 20, 2014 at 8:15 am

      I’ve got some interesting finds coming up Kev – watch this space. 😀

      Like

        Kev said:
        March 20, 2014 at 1:21 pm

        Will do Jo. 🙂

        Like

    laurie27wsmith said:
    March 17, 2014 at 11:25 am

    I ended up in the Philippines when I copied and pasted those co=ordinates Jo. Some form of conspiracy now? Liked your post, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with sci.fi/fantasy. It’s great to escape into another world now and then.

    Like

      jorobinson176 responded:
      March 20, 2014 at 8:07 am

      That’s weird Laurie – I’ll check that I haven’t put them in wrong. I love me my conspiracies, but this one seems really odd. That black roof thingy doesn’t look at all natural. I absolutely LOVED your last post by the way – you are full of great surprises! 🙂

      Like

    weavergrace said:
    March 17, 2014 at 2:41 pm

    I am guilty of sometimes considering art to be a low priority, even though I am an artist. I think of it as frivolous, expendable. Then I read what your friend said about sci-fi/fantasy being a waste of time, and my troops explode into action. I jolt into recognition of the value of creativity for scientists as they reach for ways to learn more about phenomena.

    When I was a teen, I was captivated by a novel that included an author who channeled messages from aliens. They didn’t call it channeling back then, but modern language might use that term. One of the points of the book was to credit aliens for our creativity. One of my posts goes a little more into my thoughts along this vein. I like where you take it with our ancient collective memories. I think of this kind of thing (on a relatively micro scale) as I write a fictional autobiography by my grandmother’s grandmother.

    You stretched my mind a size larger when I read, “We lose particles and we gain new particles. Particles that have been around for all eternity…” What a great thought to ponder. Thank you for your leadership out to this connection with the universe.

    Like

      jorobinson176 responded:
      March 20, 2014 at 8:05 am

      Your post has me thinking genius – seriously – I’m guessing your IQ is WAY up there. Cool! I read somewhere that Einstein used to meditate, and channel his knowledge from somewhere too. Are you using facts in your fictional autobiography at all? I totally believe that everything that is or was leaves a physical residue that floats around forever, so bring on the channeling I reckon! 😉

      Like

      weavergrace said:
      March 21, 2014 at 1:16 am

      Your response frightens the heck out of me. What did I write, or did you confuse me with someone else?

      Facts in my fictional autobiography: I have a photo of her husband and one of her mother. I have accounts written by other authors of events and customs at the time nearby. I corresponded with a woman who lives on part of the family homestead. Her husband is a distant cousin of mine. I have wills and land deeds regarding her grandparents and great uncles.

      Like

        weavergrace said:
        March 21, 2014 at 1:37 am

        I accidentally sent my reply before I was ready. I was in the middle of typing that I was afraid of responding because you would probably discover that my IQ is WAY lower than yours. I could channel Einstein’s source with an IQ of nearly 0, couldn’t I?

        I had not come across anything about Einstein meditating. I looked it up, and found that he said that meditation gives us the answers before we ask the questions. Huh.

        So, as I read other’s accounts of what someone like my grandmother’s grandmother might have done, an occasional detail sparks pages of story. I thought that I needed to go to the locations where my grandmother’s grandmother was, so I could pick up on the vibes. According to your insight, I can access those vibes right here. Huh.

        Thank you for your illuminating ideas.

        Like

          jorobinson176 responded:
          March 22, 2014 at 2:10 pm

          I’m a guru! 😀 I reckon that every story becomes a reality somewhere / somehow, and that sometimes what is meant to be shared will be. Like key bits of knowledge will fly around and around zooming through thousands of heads until they find a connection with a particular storyteller, and fertile ground to grow. Yes – I have been told I’m nuts – cool with it. I’m very sure that your great grandmother’s story as she wants it told will be the one that arrives at your finger tips – if you get my drift. Einstein was quite normal in a crazy way, wasn’t he? LOL! I bet he thought he was just another guy while he did the things he did. It always amazes me reading the private lives of the famous. For instance – Enid Blyton was a terrible mother – not at all liked by her own children, but hero to so many others, including yours truly. 🙂

          Like

            weavergrace said:
            March 23, 2014 at 1:16 pm

            Jo, if you’re nuts, it’s a cool, happy, constructive kind of nuts to be. Your referring to Einstein as crazy led me to his famous quote that I had never read or heard before.

            “A question that sometimes drives me hazy:
            Am I or are the others crazy?”

            I am crazy about his other quotes that I found at that website.

            I never heard or read about Enid Blyton either. How illiterate I am! I see that she was more popular than J.K. Rowling one year (when my family was immersed in the Harry Potter series), even post-mortem.

            You got me thinking about the value of books that were actually touched by their authors or other significant people, especially post-mortem when such are considered a finite number. Perhaps these contain a higher concentration of the person’s inspiring particles. But, as you and I suspect, perhaps the number of particles is not relevant, for the power of just one particle could be infinite.

            Yes, my fingertips dance across the keyboard (and with a pen across the page) when “telling” my grandmother’s grandmother’s story. I would like to tell her story with a quill pen, but I am not quite such a purist.

            Like

              jorobinson176 responded:
              March 27, 2014 at 10:22 am

              Old Albert is on my “to meet” list in the afterlife now – so brilliant, and a nice guy too. I love that quote about people not doing anything about evil too. It’s because you’re a spring chicken and not an old duck like me that you don’t know Enid Blyton. I used to love her as a child – Secret 7 & Famous 5. 🙂 Now I am a total Harry Potter nut! My TBR pile is always to high these days to read the last three books. I saw the movies, but I think I’ll prefer the books.

              You have a wicked cool imagination! I’m really looking forward to reading your books. 🙂

              Like

                weavergrace said:
                March 28, 2014 at 1:14 am

                When you were reading Enid Blyton, I might have been reading books with Newbery Medals on them. Madeleine L’Engle was most memorable. My mother was a purist.

                I love hearing other old codgers talking about TBR piles. I am horrified by the thought of printing presses shutting down. E-books sound like a great idea, but not as cuddly as paper pages.

                The Harry Potter books, as I’m sure you have heard repeatedly, are much better than the movies. I can’t imagine watching the movies before reading the books; it seems that a lot wouldn’t make sense. It seems that they expected the audience to know the story, and they just showed highlights. Much seemed to be out of context and incongruent.

                I”m looking forward to reading my books, too 🙂 I hope one pulls itself together. My characters have trouble getting me to sit still long enough so they can tell their stories. If only I could just write continuously, but then I’d miss out on the rest of life, and I don’t want that. Maybe I should wear a voice recorder…

                I have been so busy blogging, my TBR pile keeps growing. I would like to add your books to it, but don’t want them to topple the pile. They are on my list… I’m glad to connect with you here.

                Like

                  jorobinson176 responded:
                  April 4, 2014 at 2:38 pm

                  I was reading Enid Blyton a LONG time ago. 😀 Madeline L’Engle rings a bell with me, but I can’t remember a specific book. I was a strange child – read Jonathon Livingston Seagull when I was eight because I couldn’t find anything when I had one of my must read right now urges.
                  I’ve missed the pure pleasure of reading for a while now because of too many commitments – that particular joy of browsing around and spotting a book that you’ve been wanting. I’m going to do that now – I reckon one from the TBR then one purely for pleasure. That way the TBR will be something to look forward to I think.

                  I only watched the final movies before reading the books because we were living in Zim in the middle of the bush – it’s a funny old place with getting exactly what you want, but lovely at the same time. I’m planning on reading the whole series again (in the pleasure pile) from front to end. Love JK! The final movies were disappointing.

                  LOL! I’d like to meet your muse – then again, maybe not if she’s as intimidating as mine. 😀 I think they could be related if your characters are anything to go by. Reading your own finished book from cover to cover is the most terrifying and wonderful thing in the world – you’ll blow yourself away. Not keen on the sound of my own voice so I’ll stick to the scribbling.

                  Don’t add my books to your TBR now. I’m sorting the page breaks in Shadow People (each chapter starting on the RH page :P) and when it’s perfect I’ll send you a paper book as a pressie with pleasure. And I am more than glad to connect with you to – peas in a pod. 🙂

                  Like

                    WeaverGrace said:
                    May 14, 2014 at 2:47 pm

                    My WordPress Reader is to me like the library bookshelves were to myself as a young child: THE place to go to spontaneously find something to read. I also discovered Poets & Writers magazine a few months ago which is to me like Highlights Magazine was to myself as a young child: assorted writing styles curated for the discriminating reader.

                    Thank you for your offer of the pressie. If you would like my help before it reaches that state, I would be honored.

                    Like

                      jorobinson176 responded:
                      May 16, 2014 at 12:14 pm

                      I love my blog reading too – I have serious sourface issues when I can’t get to them every day. If you pop your address and email address in the Contact Me thingy above, I’ll zoom reading your way. 🙂

                      Like

                      WeaverGrace said:
                      May 17, 2014 at 2:36 am

                      I have been enjoying reading what you have been zooming my way. Not only are you zoomy like me, but you’re also a good zoomer 🙂 I’m jealous of anyone who can reach their Reader daily.

                      Like

                      jorobinson176 responded:
                      May 20, 2014 at 9:53 am

                      I’m always late for everything these days – zooming or not. 🙂 Did I send you my books? If I did, I should resend the updated ones – I can’t find your email address. LOLOLOL! I really am a dilly old bat. 😀

                      Like

                      WeaverGrace said:
                      May 22, 2014 at 2:12 am

                      I think you have my email address now 🙂 Your books will get VIP treatment in the TBR pile when I get them.

                      dilly old bat. bat dilly old. old dilly bat. Hmmmmmm I don’t see how any of those words in any combination apply to you.

                      Like

    Sherri said:
    March 18, 2014 at 4:19 pm

    Fascinating post Jo. Dragons? Why not? I’m sure they existed once upon a time. Dinosaurs? You were ahead of the game, massive raspberry here. And that Google search! And Puma Punka! Wow!! I’ve learned so much here. My daughter (who knows far more than I do and is sitting next to me as I type this!) hasn’t seen this ‘abyss’ (which is what it looks like to me!) nor Puma Punka either.
    But, that painting at the end…oh Jo my dear, lovely friend, you need to keep writing what you write best.
    YOU ROCK 🙂 xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 🙂 🙂 🙂 xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Like

      jorobinson176 responded:
      March 20, 2014 at 7:57 am

      You and your baby girl ROCK Sherri! This stuff is so amazing because it’s so easy to see with Google Earth and no photo-shopping and so on. It’s completely deserted, so those big old holes should at least have coverings of snow, but they’re just way too smooth. Puma Punk also freaks me out because some of those stones have been cut out of cliff-faces in mountains so many thousands of years ago – the mind boggles. Well my mind is probably too good at boggling. LOVES AND HUGS my lovely friend. Have you seen the new WP smileys?? Have a 🌯 LOLOLOLOL! ❤ O_o 😎 🐻 😀 XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX 😉

      Like

        Sherri said:
        March 20, 2014 at 9:02 pm

        Woo hoo!!!! Very thought-provoking and fascinating and yes, freaky too! Boggle away, ha ha!!
        Yes, the new smileys just appeared. How did you get all those? I want them too…wahhhhhhhhhhhhhhh…. 😉 xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 😉

        Like

    Seumas Gallacher said:
    March 31, 2014 at 5:28 am

    great, intriguing post, m’Lady… I’ve also often pondered about the DNA thing, and different particles carrying ‘memory’ in the DNA .. enjoyed the post immensely … 🙂

    Like

      jorobinson176 responded:
      April 4, 2014 at 2:10 pm

      Thank you Seamus! It’s to do with the number three apparently – my next trip into the fabulous crazy universe. 🙂

      Like

    spiritsunshine said:
    April 11, 2014 at 1:54 am

    thank you for this wonderful post. I enjoy reading your blog and I also look forward to reading your book. You are very inspiring 🙂

    Like

      jorobinson176 responded:
      April 13, 2014 at 12:43 pm

      Thank you – wow! I’ve been thinking the very same thing about you – inspiring! 🙂 X

      Like

        spiritsunshine said:
        April 13, 2014 at 6:10 pm

        No way! you are way more awesomer (is that a word) lol… it is now… i just made it up….. in a nutshell I love your work. 🙂

        Like

          jorobinson176 responded:
          April 26, 2014 at 10:11 am

          LOL! It sure is now! Thank you my friend! 🙂

          Like

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