Does Everyone Deserve Compassion?

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Individually we can’t fix the whole world, and seeing the awful things going on all over I’m sure that a lot of us would rather look away, so it’s wonderful to see so many people out there trying to help in any way that they can. Humans are strange beings. Most are instinctively compassionate. Not all though. We’re powerful creatures in our ability to hurt. Lately with all the barbaric killings of innocents, committed in ways premeditated to be both painful and terrifying both for those who are being so brutally murdered, and for those who see these things, I’ve been wondering what goes on the minds of those killers as they execute that final act. What would happen to them if in that final minute they found that they couldn’t do it? Probably their compassion lies elsewhere, and all they feel is hatred for their victims, so that’s not likely to happen. Those of us who feel compassion for their victims then get to feel hatred for them, and if we could hurt them in return, would we? Probably not.

Can you feel compassion for one who hates like that? The viciousness of the farm invasions up in Zimbabwe shocked me. The levels of violence seemed unnecessarily evil to me. A couple of things seemed senseless. Dogs, pets, and livestock were sought out and methodically beaten or maimed. The invaders would slash the tendons on the front legs of cattle, while their owners could only watch helplessly as the animals cried in pain as they crawled bleeding along the ground. Home invasions (a burglary where the robbers are fully aware that there’s somebody home) here in South Africa are the same. It’s not only about the stealing. Clearly they want to hurt, and humiliate as much as they can. An old lady was repeatedly burned with boiling water which the robbers boiled the kettle for, over and over to pour over her. Later she died from her injuries. They felt no compassion for the defenceless woman they did this to – no – their compassion lay with the victims of their own people who had been wronged by hers. Still. How can you feel compassion for someone who does that?

I find it pretty hard. I would very happily beat the crap out of anyone who did that if I could. I do understand the deep rooted hatred that causes such acts though. I just don’t accept it. Why should one person suffer for the wrongs of others, just because she’s the same colour as they were? The way the world is, with nations hating nations – remembering all the hurts of the past, compassion isn’t easy to come by. We’re human after all. I save my compassion for the helpless. I will never have compassion for those who choose to hurt or kill the helpless – no matter what has happened in their histories. Two wrongs don’t make a right. Sometimes terrible things happen to people, who then choose to go on and do further terrible things. Circle without end. They don’t get my compassion, because the choice to continue the cycle of terrible things is their own.

But at some point we’re all going to have to try and figuratively walk miles in the shoes of others, no matter how different to us we perceive them to be. Maybe understanding will help. I see voices raised by so many people around the world today, asking for understanding, and to not blame entire nations for the actions of some. They’re getting louder, and they’re getting heard, and we have to hope that our compassion for each other, regardless of race, colour, or creed, will become strong enough to overcome the actions of individuals or groups committing atrocities, and causing us to act with suspicion and hatred towards others who have done no wrong. Compassion may be our only weapon to break vicious cycles everywhere.

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74 thoughts on “Does Everyone Deserve Compassion?

    john flanagan said:
    February 20, 2015 at 3:24 pm

    Thank You, Jo
    for sharing this very necessary offering.

    Best Wishes

    john

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 20, 2015 at 4:05 pm

      Thanks to you John! It’s fantastic how many bloggers have joined in with this – Twitter is abuzz with some really inspiring things – feeling the love out there today. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    Jack Eason said:
    February 20, 2015 at 4:07 pm

    Everyone except extremists like ISIS Jo.

    Liked by 4 people

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 20, 2015 at 4:14 pm

      Totally agree Jack! Their behavior is inhuman. We have to stop pussyfooting about, and sort these things out once and for all, so that no innocent or helpless being ever gets their lives taken by this kind of evil.

      Liked by 2 people

        Jack Eason said:
        February 20, 2015 at 4:19 pm

        My thoughts exactly.

        Liked by 1 person

          jorobinson176 responded:
          February 20, 2015 at 4:22 pm

          That’s why I don’t believe that everyone deserves compassion. That lot certainly don’t – just get rid of them as quickly as possible in my opinion, and don’t waste any time trying to turn them around – it will never work.

          Liked by 2 people

            C.E.Robinson said:
            February 20, 2015 at 6:55 pm

            Jo, killers are sociopaths, they don’t have a conscience so no compassion for anything! Christine

            Liked by 2 people

    Jack Eason said:
    February 20, 2015 at 4:18 pm

    Reblogged this on Have We Had Help? and commented:
    What are your thoughts on having compassion for others? Here’s what our Jo has to say on the subject. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    The Story Reading Ape said:
    February 20, 2015 at 4:28 pm

    Those individuals who carry out these evil acts are just that – evil – and they have absolutely no sense of remorse Jo – and the sooner they are eradicated the better…
    I also know that the religions and nationalities they claim to represent are not, in fact, being represented…
    As far as I am aware, no other species of creature on this planet, except humans, deliberately torture and humiliate others.

    Liked by 2 people

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 20, 2015 at 4:33 pm

      You’re right Chris. There’s no point in thinking that evil can be rehabilitated, and the time for talk is way gone. They definitely just need to be taken out before they kill any more – nobody wants them around.
      I was thinking the same thing the other day – somewhere along the way we got a bit too twisted – the mind boggles when you see the things people do to torture. I agree totally – evil exists, and some of it is people. They need to be pruned out ……

      Liked by 3 people

        The Story Reading Ape said:
        February 20, 2015 at 4:35 pm

        Agreed Jo.

        Liked by 1 person

        soireadthisbooktoday said:
        March 9, 2015 at 8:43 am

        Being trained in police sciences, forensics and psychology, I absolutely agree. We forget – humans are animals. Period. We dress it up, put clothes on it, but humans. Are. Animals. The only thing is, we are animals with a level of intellect. An intellect that allows the true sociopaths and psychopaths, those born without conscious, or what we prefer to call “soul”, to commit acts of unbelievable atrocity with total abandon. To do these things simply because they can. Because it amuses them, or allows them to believe they feel some sense of emotion, even though they are completely incapable of feeling anything – no emotion, no joy, no pain, no love.

        I am not a hater of all humankind. I know there are good people out there. But as much as those who cry over the ‘poor criminals’ would like to make us believe that there are “cures” for everyone – believe me. There are no cures for people who have nothing of what, again, we prefer to call “soul” – none of the connections in the brain which allow them to feel remorse, compassion, any of the things that make them salvageable. Do I believe that they are better off dead? Yes. But more than that, WE are better off with them deleted from society. Do they deserve our compassion? Here is the thing – they don’t, for they don’t even UNDERSTAND compassion. And any show of compassion toward them will only lead to them considering you weak and easily manipulated. And those easily manipulated, in trying to “help” the “poor misunderstood criminal” gets them released – only to allow them to prey on their victims again. Ask the mothers of children who are mutilated and slaughtered by released sociopaths (as an example) if they think that the monsters should be released. . . I think you will find that they would disagree with the concept – any right minded human being certainly would, wouldn’t you think? But overabundant “compassion” often leads to a complete lack of Logical Thinking – which leads to more pain, more death, more destruction of minds and souls and bodies.

        Then, of course, there are those whose psychological and emotional ‘short-circuits’ are wired in such a way that they actually enjoy maiming, torturing and killing. It is the only way they derive enjoyment – by bring pain and death to others. So – emotions – but only those of a feral, rabid beast. Do they deserve to live, while their victims die in horror and agony? Do they deserve compassion while their victims do not? I have much more compassion for the innocents, the victims, the death of potential at the hands of monsters who have no potential whatsoever other than for death and destruction.

        Like

    Smorgasbord - Variety is the Spice of Life. said:
    February 20, 2015 at 4:29 pm

    I think compassion and forgiveness is possible but it is a two way street. If someone is hell bent on continuing to commit violence against others without a hint of remorse or contrition then I am sorry they are not deserving of compassion, however troubled their childhoods or their racial abuse in the past. There are millions of people who have suffered throughout their lives at the hands of others but they end up well adjusted, kind and empathetic people… I think that those that hurt and violate others are just looking for justification for their own desire for power over somebody else or to impress weak minded individuals who see it as a glorious pursuit. Nice one Jo – will get a lot of people thinking about the subject.. hugs

    Liked by 2 people

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 20, 2015 at 4:37 pm

      Exactly Sally! No matter how awful your childhood has been (I mean no disrespect for those still suffering because of this), it really is always possible as an adult to make choices about how you choose to live your life, and the person you choose to be. There’s no excuse for hurting any other other than personal choice to do so. Thank you my lovely friend. HUGS! ❤ XXXX

      Liked by 1 person

    Smorgasbord - Variety is the Spice of Life. said:
    February 20, 2015 at 4:31 pm

    Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    Jo Robinson asks the question – does everyone deserve compassion or do they forfeit that right with a particular level of evilness? Pop over to her blog and voice your opinion .

    Liked by 1 person

    olganm said:
    February 20, 2015 at 4:41 pm

    Thanks Jo. Ultimately hatred is destructive for everybody.

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 20, 2015 at 4:45 pm

      It really is Olga – and you know much more than me about these things. I think that sometimes compassion is misplaced, and so the abominations continue – maybe we as a species really need to put our collective foot down, and excise the rot wherever it pops up, so we can all move on I reckon.

      Like

    lucciagray said:
    February 20, 2015 at 5:00 pm

    I agree with you that not everyone deserves, needs, or even wants, compassion, but I’d say that everyone who sincerely asks for compassion, whatever they have done, is probably entitled to some. The problem is posed by those who do not ask for it, because they don’t feel regret or remorse. I’d also distinguish compassion and forgiveness. You can feel the former but not the latter. It’s a complex concept. I’m glad you addressed another perspective on the topic.

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 20, 2015 at 5:04 pm

      People who genuinely ask for compassion after doing wrong are probably punishing themselves with guilt, so definitely they should get it. I totally get what you’re saying – I’ve felt compassion but not forgiven, and strangely vice versa too sometimes. Thank you Luccia for this – it really is such a complex thing, but it’s good to get out in the open sometimes, even though it’s hard to think about.

      Liked by 1 person

    danniehill said:
    February 20, 2015 at 5:02 pm

    I have compassion for the people who are persecuted for the sins of others. There are many who would stand up and speak about what is right, but if they do they are likely to die at the hands of their own people.

    As for groups like ISIS and other radical Muslim groups. They deserve all the wrath the world can bring to them. I know it’s not only a one kind of people who perpetrate atrocities in this world. Tribalism, Nationalism, religious ardor, and just plain greed seem to rule much of the world today. And in truth most people are good and have compassion for others, but they are so hard to see in the shadows.

    I enjoyed your words, Jo.

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 20, 2015 at 5:09 pm

      Thank you Dannie! Having read your book I know that you get this whole concept at a soul level. I was thinking about people who get themselves involved in sects as well, and then just can’t get out for fear of reprisal as well. ISIS and the other radicals whatever they may be I’m hoping will get some effective wrath soon. I agree that most people are good too – it’s frightening to have to stand against powerful evil, but that doesn’t mean that we agree with it. Thanks again Dannie. ❤

      Like

    Carol Balawyder said:
    February 20, 2015 at 5:30 pm

    “First of all,” he said, “if you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you’ll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view […] until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.”
    That quote is from To Kill A Mockingbird and is really what compassion is all about.
    But how can you walk in the shoes of someone who has abused you as a child? How can you walk in the shoes of terrorists?
    I have a hard time with compassion. I have no problem being compassionate towards the suffering, the poor, starving children, folks having to start over their lives because of an earthquake, fires or other catastrophies. That’s easy. What is difficult (impossible) for me is to feel compassion towards terrorists.
    Should we? Should we not feel compassion that they spend their lives hating and not having value on human life?
    Should compassion be limited? Should it include everyone?
    I am all for building a better world. A peaceful world. But what about those who don’t want a peaceful world? Who want harm? Who have no use for compassion?

    Here’s a beautiful song telling us all what we need:. Play it loud! Sing it wide!

    Thanks, Jo, for your thought provoking post. Hugs.

    Liked by 2 people

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 20, 2015 at 6:00 pm

      True, true, true! I love that quote. I think maybe that if we could get into some skins, we probably wouldn’t feel compassion, only fear and loathing maybe. I really don’t want to look out of the eyes of a person who has abused a child or killed purely because they like it. No. I love your words Carol – compassion is not for all – only the deserving. I honestly think that those who now feel compassion also need to feel anger – and get rid of the huge amount of pain that’s causing our global compassion. Spot on lovely lady! Love Dionne – and this song – thank you. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    Erica Herd said:
    February 20, 2015 at 6:17 pm

    Like you, I don’t believe everyone deserves compassion, particularly those who willfully torture, abuse or kill innocent children, animals and adults, and sex traffickers. Don’t get me started on that one.

    Liked by 2 people

    belsbror said:
    February 20, 2015 at 6:20 pm

    Like forgiving, there should be regret first. Compassion is for those who deserve it the most: the needy, the outcasts, the hungry, the displaced, and all those innocents in places of armed conflicts,
    On the other hand, people who intentionally commit abuses, including crimes that result to injuries and deaths could only ask compassion from their victims and their loved ones. If they so wish to spare their attackers from punishment, they can do so. However, governments are duty-bound to punish criminals accordingly. Compassion should be given on a case-to-case basis,

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:04 am

      I totally agree. People do change sometimes, and truly regret bad deeds of the past – maybe we all do in smaller ways. Forgiveness is the choice of the victim, but compassion is sometimes needed for those who deserve it.

      Liked by 1 person

    davidprosser said:
    February 20, 2015 at 6:30 pm

    All very true Jo. Such a shame that some people just don’t have empathy so they can commit these acts without a second thought. But there is so much compassion about now that maybe patches of light are starting to shine through and maybe we can eventually stop violence on a large scale like wars even if we can’t change the people who commit the individual acts.
    xxx Massive Hugs xxx

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:06 am

      I can’t imagine what’s in the heads of people without empathy – must be dark and cold in there. You’re so right about the patches of light though David – especially online – I see much love around and with people becoming more aware of what’s happening around the world I’m sure you’re right. XXX LOVE and HUGS XXX

      Liked by 1 person

    Let's CUT the Crap! said:
    February 20, 2015 at 6:47 pm

    Compassion I understand; violence towards helpless or innocent I do not.
    I cannot add anything, Jo. You have written this so well and I agree with you.

    Liked by 2 people

    merrildsmith said:
    February 20, 2015 at 7:02 pm

    Great post! One can have compassion toward those who have suffered, and one can understand their suffering without condoning violence. You said it perfectly.

    Liked by 1 person

    billyraychitwood1 said:
    February 20, 2015 at 7:13 pm

    danniehill and Jack Eason say it for me, Jo… Your words resonate.

    Liked by 1 person

    BRI said:
    February 20, 2015 at 7:15 pm

    Thanks for sharing! Check out http://www.peaceduringthejourney.com

    Liked by 1 person

    Sally Ember, Ed.D. said:
    February 20, 2015 at 7:19 pm

    The answer to your title question is “Yes,” but not everyone deserves acceptance, mercy, tolerance or respect. Those have to be earned.

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:09 am

      Perfectly said Sally! We can feel compassion for those who can’t, but they don’t deserve to have their deeds accepted.

      Liked by 1 person

    hastywords said:
    February 20, 2015 at 7:28 pm

    I was really struggling to write my post on compassion and I am happy to come across one that spoke to the difficulty of compassion. It is definitely not easy and I had to really struggle this week. Thank you for this perspective.

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:11 am

      It’s interesting that you say that. This took me quite a while to write – normally I’m quick with writing posts. Funny how something as seemingly simple as compassion can be so challenging to write about.

      Liked by 1 person

        hastywords said:
        February 27, 2015 at 5:36 pm

        Absolutely, I think it was even harder knowing that so many were writing on the same subject and you struggle to dig deeper 🙂

        Like

    Nishi said:
    February 20, 2015 at 9:02 pm

    We see small acts of compassion all around us time and again and then these stories of violence and barbarism just throws us off and we feel all hopes lost for the world..The story of the attacks in Zimbabwe had me in tears literally…Its difficult to understand and comprehend the extend to which these sadists go..I guess the only way to go about this is to pray for their souls and stay firm on doing atleast one compassionate act a day per person..Here’s to a beautiful World! Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:12 am

      Thank you Nishi – I love your plan on doing one compassionate act a day! If the whole world did that – wow – here’s to a beautiful world indeed! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    Kev said:
    February 20, 2015 at 9:50 pm

    Great article, Jo. I can’t add anything to it that would add any value. But I see this part of you in all your writings. You have a beautiful soul.

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:15 am

      Thank you Kev – you’ll have me bawling in a minute. You’re a wonderful man with a very visibly beautiful soul yourself you know – that’s the only place such lovely words get to come from. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    Serins said:
    February 20, 2015 at 10:41 pm

    Beautifully said. I live in Namibia, where the same kind of atrocities shock me. why? I ask do you need to hurt someone so brutally, if you are hungry just steal and move on. These people choose to hate because of past hurts. They choose to hate because perhaps they currently feel wronged by the injustice of it all.

    Yes, I get that you feeling hungry is not fair while I have much to eat. But is it then fair for you to do such horrible things? NO! Violence just begets more violence. It needs to end somewhere.

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:19 am

      I must find out more about what happened in Namibia – I haven’t yet, and the way things happened there are definitely on my list of really want to know. The violence really needs to end somewhere. Lumping people into those deserving of your hatred because of their skin colour is evil in itself if you don’t know who they are and how they think.

      Liked by 1 person

        Serins said:
        February 27, 2015 at 6:55 am

        I wrote a post on Apartheid and Racism some time ago… if you are interested. The longer violence such as this persists the more hatred there will be. It is sad but true. People don’t tend to think of it in a rational manner. They just see black guy or white guy raped my mother, beat my father or even beat me. It does not matter that it was not this specific person. they see only the skin color of the the person who did such crimes.
        If only I / we knew how to stop the hatred… Education and compassion is what it will take. These people need to learn that not all people from the opposing color are their enemy.
        https://serinssphere.wordpress.com/2014/09/10/apartheid-and-racism/

        Like

    Bette A. Stevens said:
    February 21, 2015 at 1:28 am

    I’m FOR COMPASSION, especially for those who are hurting or helpless. There are some in my life for whom forgiveness from me seems impossible since they don’t know or care what compassion for others is. But I know that those who seem to have no compassion for others are the ones who need it the most. Especially with kids. They all need lots of love and compassion…if they get it, they may mirror it in their own lives. Perhaps we wouldn’t have to deal with the horrors of hate if they got it. Everybody needs a lots of love! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:23 am

      Everybody needs lots of love! ❤ Love it Bette! Some things for me are unforgivable, and no matter how hard I try there are people I doubt that I could bring myself to feel compassion for – I'm just happy that they're a tiny minority – most people get the love. 🙂

      Like

    mgill0627 said:
    February 21, 2015 at 7:23 am

    This is a very puzzling issue. Whenever I hear about a person hurting animals, or the defensless, I want to lash out and de-humnaize them. I really feel that people who do things like you described lack a fundamental humanity. On the other hand, that’s a very slippery slope. I wish I knew the answer. It just seems like there is too much hate, anger, fighting. As soon as one conflict is settled, another one crops up. It’s disheartenting. But there are so many good people out there as well, doing great and beautiful things. Maybe that’s the hope for all.

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:27 am

      I so agree about hurting animals or the defenseless – this brings out a violence in myself that probably is bad in itself – still if you can willfully harm then you leave yourself open to being willfully harmed right back. I think that some things like poverty and lifestyle, as well as education – young minds are easy to shape the wrong way – have a lot to do with things too. I also lean towards hope, like you.

      Like

    Mira Prabhu said:
    February 21, 2015 at 8:27 am

    Reblogged this on mira prabhu and commented:
    Does everyone deserve our compassion? Interesting question and challenging for many of us on the path to the heart…for me, compassion does not necessarily mean being soft and gentle…it can be a hard kick in the butt or worse…tough love is compassion too…read what Jo Robinson has to say on this intriguing subject…

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:28 am

      Thank you for sharing Mira! I love every word you say here – a hard kick in the butt can be compassion in my book any day of the week, ❤

      Like

    drewdog2060drewdog2060 said:
    February 21, 2015 at 11:58 am

    This is a great post Jo. I think sometimes people use pass wrongs as an excuse for unacceptable or downright cruel behaviour. For example the insistence by some that the United Kingdom and other participants in the transatlantic slave trade apologise for the actions of former generations. Slavery was (and is) barbaric, however it is ludicrous to expect today’s generation, far removed as it is from slavery to apologise. I can (and should) apologise for my own mistakes and, in some circumstances parents should say sorry for the actions of their children, howver I will not apologise for an historic wrong in which I played no part. AAny non-white who directs their anger against whites in general has a problem as do those whites who hate people of other colours. People need to move on. We can and should learn from the past but we can not live there. If we continue to dwell on past wrongs then compassion is twisted into hatred. Kevin

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:33 am

      Thank you Kevin! Blaming the wrongs of previous generations is pretty much what ails the world today I think. It can be pretty scary to look at too. I don’t condone any wrongs done in the past, but like you, I don’t take responsibility for them. The results of the actions of my ancestors – I do agree that things have to be made right – as in land ownership, dignity, and democracy.

      Like

    hilarycustancegreen said:
    February 21, 2015 at 2:07 pm

    I agree, and think we may even have to extend it to the killers. Many of the people who commit these barbaric acts are as afraid as they are cruel. Many are being manipulated by someone who will threaten to do to them what they are asked to do to another, if they fail to do it. This is especially true of children and younger recruits. It is well described in Captain Correlli’s Mandolin.

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:36 am

      Children who are forced to do evil need all the compassion in the world. I’ve seen a couple of documentaries about some of them who have escaped, and some of their expressions really show their terror of what they were made to do. I can’t imagine how a child must feel having the death of another on their minds all the time, even if they had no choice.

      Like

    1000 voices speak for compassion | Happy Pollyesther said:
    February 21, 2015 at 2:10 pm

    […] “Compassion is the emotion that one feels in response to the suffering of others that motivates a desire to help.” is what Wikipedia tells us. While it is easy to find compassion for victims of brutality, finding it for the perpetrators is another matter as is evidenced in the blog post by Jo Robinson I came across that alerted me to the cause of “1000 voices speak for compassion”. (https://africolonialstories.wordpress.com/2015/02/20/does-everyone-deserve-compassion/) […]

    Liked by 1 person

    pollyesther said:
    February 21, 2015 at 2:33 pm

    Thank you for alerting me to this great action! I jumped straight on board, into my blog and wrote a post in response to your post that would have been a bit to long and deep to post in comments 😉 I think I made the deadline, just…

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:39 am

      Thanks to you! I’ll head over and read it. 🙂 I believe that they’re going to do 1000 Speak events regularly now. It’s great to see bloggers come together like this – awesome bunch!

      Liked by 1 person

        pollyesther said:
        February 27, 2015 at 3:18 pm

        Thank you and yes it is a great initiative, I also met a few new blogger friends through it too 🙂 Looking forward to the next one!

        Like

    mihrank said:
    February 21, 2015 at 9:46 pm

    this is incredible and powerful post – I felt watching a movie in a theatre and such strong!

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:39 am

      Thank you Mihran! Your music does the same to me. ❤

      Like

    Snarky Momma With Love said:
    February 22, 2015 at 1:18 am

    So beautifully written. You made me feel your feelings and really made me think about my own struggle with compassion lately. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

      jorobinson176 responded:
      February 27, 2015 at 5:40 am

      Thanks to you! Compassion can really be hard to give sometimes. Being human is a slippery slope all the way. ❤

      Like

    Does Everyone Deserve Compassion? | 1000 Voices... said:
    February 27, 2015 at 5:37 pm

    […] Individually we can’t fix the whole world, and seeing the awful things going on all over I’m sure that a lot of us would rather look away, so it’s wonderful to see so many people out there trying t…  […]

    Like

    roweeee said:
    March 6, 2015 at 4:48 pm

    Hi Jo,
    Sorry it took me so long to get to your post for 1000 Voices. I had quite a methodical approach and started from the beginning and read about 60 posts and my post was the last one uploaded and I went from the end for awhile. Then I realised that I had read so many hard and challenging stories that I needed a break. That I needed some humour and a bit of light.
    I don’t know whether you have heard about the two Australians who are awaiting execution in Indonesia after attempting to smuggle heroin into Australia. They have radically changed their lives and I feel deserve compassion and that these men fitted well into your discussions in your post. Here’s the link:
    https://beyondtheflow.wordpress.com/2015/02/19/brain-plasticity-two-australians-on-death-row/
    xx Rowena

    Like

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